Saturday, September 8, 2012

Obamarama



Well, the Charlotte, North Carolina Obamarama finally ended . . . not with a bang but a whimper.


The convention featured speaker after speaker devoted to attacking the Romney-Ryan ticket as if THEY were the incumbents. The Social Democrats have no record of achievement about which they can boast. And after rousing speeches by Michelle Obama, Joe Biden, and Bill Clinton, President Obama brought let the house down.

Even the Washington Post wrote of the speech's “hazy agenda” for the possible second term.





 

Obama opened the speech with an allusion to the theme of his first speech before the Democratic National Convention back in 2004 and one he campaigned on in 2008--hope and change.

Now, the first time I addressed this convention in 2004, I was a younger man; a Senate candidate from Illinois who spoke about hope, not blind optimism or wishful thinking, but hope in the face of difficulty; hope in the face of uncertainty; that dogged faith in the future which has pushed this nation forward, even when the odds are great; even when the road is long.

Eight years later, that hope has been tested, by the cost of war; by one of the worst economic crises in history; and by political gridlock that’s left us wondering whether it’s still even possible to tackle the challenges of our time.”


Although Obama never tires of reminding us that he inherited the war and the economic crisis, the gridlock was his own doing. Instead of tackling the unemployment problem, the Obama administration turned stimulus packages into benefits programs for political supporters and turned health insurance reform into the greatest assertion of federal power since the New Deal. The voters reacted to this overreach in the midterm elections of 2010.


Obama then hammered on the theme of all previous speakers: this election is about choice. (And which election isn't?)

And on every issue, the choice you face won’t be just between two candidates or two parties.

It will be a choice between two different paths for America.

A choice between two fundamentally different visions for the future.

But when all is said and done, when you pick up that ballot to vote, you will face the clearest choice of any time in a generation. Over the next few years, big decisions will be made in Washington, on jobs, the economy; taxes and deficits; energy, education; war and peace, decisions that will have a huge impact on our lives and our children’s lives for decades to come.

And on every issue, the choice you face won’t be just between two candidates or two parties.

It will be a choice between two different paths for America.

A choice between two fundamentally different visions for the future.”


This could be the theme of the Republican Party convention . . . and it was!

Then he laid out the vague but ambitious agenda for the next for years on jobs, trade, energy, environment, education, foreign affairs, and even deficit reduction.

Though he reminded party members to “remember that not every problem can be remedied with another government program or dictate from Washington,” He promised to remedy every problem with another government program.

With some sentimental stories of people who gave him hope, he finally concluded:

America, I never said this journey would be easy, and I won’t promise that now. Yes, our path is harder, but it leads to a better place. Yes our road is longer, but we travel it together. We don’t turn back. We leave no one behind. We pull each other up. We draw strength from our victories, and we learn from our mistakes, but we keep our eyes fixed on that distant horizon, knowing that Providence is with us, and that we are surely blessed to be citizens of the greatest nation on Earth.”


It is difficult to imagine a more damning indictment of the Obama administration than his acknowledgement that after four years, the road is harder and the journey longer than when we began it four years ago.
 
 




Sorry, Mr. President, that is not forward.

1 comment:

CW said...

"Sorry, Mr. President, that is not forward."

Damn straight.